Leaf lesions are brown with yellow margins and often V-shaped. Do not work with canes in wet weather. The fungus infects the leaves first and then spreads to the cane. Spur Blight Didymella applanta Symptoms dark red, purple or chocolate brown spots below the spur, on young bark around buds of new shoots canes have silvery grey appearance in the winter diseased areas enlarge and girdle Lesions are fairly superficial and the fungus does not invade the vascular system. Dear gardener, You should be able to plant raspberries in the same area as long as the infected canes were removed and destroyed prior to winter. A preventive fungicide application may be desirable after pruning if the planting has a history of spur blight. The attacked branches will become dried from their tip to their base, and the attacked bark will peel. Spores are released the following spring and summer, during wet and rainy periods, and carried by splashing rain and wind to nearby primocanes. These canes appear bare and unthrifty compared to their healthy counterparts, Avoid overcrowding by thinning out any young canes that are not required. We aim to enrich everyone’s life through plants, and make the UK a greener and more beautiful place. On overwintering red raspberry canes, spur blight appears as purple to brown cankers below the buds. In extremely overgrown and weedy plantings, the disease can cause a loss in yields, especially if excessive nitrogen is applied. More info on Raspberry beetle. Fruiting bodies may be observed in fall. Avoid excess nitrogen. Spur blight is also found on Loganberry and Youngberry. The attacked branches will become dried from their tip to their base, and the attacked bark will peel. Fig. Spur blight will cause the infected areas to become non-productive. Blackberries and dewberries are highly resistant to this disea se. Anthracnose appears on most raspberries as gray spots or irregular cankers on the lower stems. Raspberry spur blight is caused by the fungus Didymella applanata. Overcrowded canes, and those that have received too much nitrogen, are more prone to attack. All species of Rubus are susceptible to spur blight, but red raspberries are particularly sensitive. Spur blight, caused by the phytopathogenic fungus Didymella applanata(Niessl.) Purple to brown lesions appear just below the leaf or bud, usually on the lower portion of the stem. Spur blight is caused by the fungus Didymella applanata. This should be done as early in the spring as possible, If spur blight develops, cut out and dispose of badly affected canes. Cane Blight Cane blight … IPM : Fruits : Spur Blight and Cane Blight of Raspberries Click on image for larger version Figure 2. A The disease is caused by the fungus Didymella applanata. Mon – Fri | 9am – 5pm, Join the RHS today and support our charity. Mature leaves are more susceptible to infection than young leaves, and so disease usually begins on the lower third of the cane. Spur blight symptoms on raspberry primocane Period of Activity Primary spores (ascospores) are discharged from May to August. On overwintering red raspberry canes, spur blight appears as purple to brown cankers below the buds. The fungus infects leaves and grows down the petiole and into the cane, where it forms a lesion. Cane botrytis. Raspberry Spur Blight. Raspberry spur blight is caused by the fungus Didymella applanata. They increase in size, spreading up and down the cane from the point of infection, As autumn and winter progress the patches become less distinct, fading to a pale grey or silvery colour. SPUR BLIGHT AND CANE BLIGHT OF RASPBERRIES Spur and cane blights are common, serious diseases of raspb erries i n Illin ois, especially dur - ing wet seasons. The spots become lesions that grow quickly and can circle the entire cane. All species of Rubus are susceptible to spur blight, but red raspberries are particularly sensitive. Its mycelium invades the cortex, wood and pith. Information is given about raspberry spur blight, a disease of raspberries [Rubus idaeus] and loganberries [R. loganobaccus], caused by the fungus Didymella applanata. These fungi can be brought into a garden on raspberry plants that are infected with the disease or from nearby, wild plants. In spring, spores (both ascospores and conidia) are released from tiny, black, round fruiting bodies. Anthracnose appears on most raspberries as gray spots or irregular cankers on the lower stems.